Benton, Adia. 2017. “Ebola at a Distance: A Pathographic Account of Anthropology’s Relevance.” Anthropological Quarterly 90 (2): 495–524.

PDF Document

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. Download adobe Acrobat or click here to download the PDF file.

License

Creative Commons Licence

Creator(s)

Contributors

Created date

August 9, 2018

Critical Commentary

AO: This 2017 paper by Adia Benton she looks at the social production of “relevant” anthropological knowledge and its relationship to four forms of distance implicated in how anthropologists communicate relevance to each other and to others: physical, disciplinary, interpretive, and agentive. She analyzes public writing by anthropologists and a November 6, 2014 meeting (“the emergency meeting”), alongside conversations with participants and observers, as diagnostic events.