Panel Description (We are screwing up and sticking with it)

Text

While technopreneurs have embraced the idea and practice of failing as necessary training for eventual success, in this panel we situate front and center our screw-ups and struggles in the classroom while divesting ourselves of the belief that we will succeed in decolonizing anything. Instead, we underscore screwing up as our default pedagogical practice, and how we endeavor to keep sticking with it. As educators, scholars, and students of the interdiscipline of STS with experience in different global contexts, we have largely organized our teaching and scholarship around decentering powerful binaries, such nonhuman/human, men/women, English/Spanish, center/periphery, democracy/autocracy, reason/emotion, sciences/indigenous knowledges. But the interventions we devise are forever incomplete and far from successful. We are all invariably caught in institutional and political contexts that structure what we can accomplish and how within and beyond the classroom, which simultaneously provide surprising affordances for experimentation. In this panel, we invite you to reflect with us about how you have included (or could include) more feminist, decolonial pedagogy, perhaps through classroom experiments and interventions, while keeping in mind that we are all flawed, imperfect feminists and anti-racists, might understand decoloniality differently, and say dumb shit once in a while. We’ll go first.

License

Creative Commons Licence

Created Date

June 14, 2021 - 9:30am

Contributed date

June 14, 2021 - 9:25am

Critical Commentary

EY: This is the panel description for the "We are Screwing Up and Sticking With It" panel of the STS as a Critical Pedagogy Workshop, Summer 2021.

Language

English

Cite as

Emily York, Lindsay Smith, sam smiley, Elizabeth Reddy and Danica Tran, 14 June 2021, "Panel Description (We are screwing up and sticking with it)", contributed by Elizabeth Reddy, sam e smiley and Lindsay A Smith, STS Infrastructures, Platform for Experimental Collaborative Ethnography, last modified 14 June 2021, accessed 16 October 2021.