John Gillespie Jr Annotations

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Wednesday, November 18, 2020 - 11:49am

Microphysiologies of desire - The term reminds me of a similar concept I've encountered recently known as "libidinal materialism." What makes Deboleena's account of desire one that is affirmative without chaos such that an ethics of mattering can be devised out of it? What aspects of desire are left unthought? 

"Microphysiologies of desire serve as the material and semiotic nervous system of biophilosophies of becoming, extending beyond a single body and connecting the knower to what is to become the known." - Her account of desire affirms its generative capacity as a means of eliding the more destructive aspects of desire? What role does destructive desire have in the microphysiology of desire? Can we think this notion beyond the human too? Can there be a posthumanist account of generative and destructive desire?

"As some readers may anticipate, no chapter on developing feminist prac- tices of encounter in the natural sciences would be complete without invoking the work of Donna Haraway. Her writing directs us toward those microphysiologies of desire that help us make connections through kin- ship and hylozoism. I am interested in bringing together and developing a vocabulary of ontological and ethical gestures that the feminist scientist might find useful in the lab. I am particularly interested in those micro- physiologies of desire that help position the feminist scientist as a knower who operates in the same immanent plane as that which is to become the known. For some time, Haraway has turned her attention to the practices and effects of multispecies entanglements. In Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene, Haraway describes the significance of her concept of “staying with the trouble.” She writes: “My multispecies story- telling is about recuperation in complex histories that are as full of dying as living, as full of endings, even genocides, as beginnings. In the face of unrelenting historically specific surplus suffering in companion species knottings, I am not interested in reconciliation or restoration, but I am deeply committed to the more modest possibilities of partial recuperation and getting on together. Call that staying with the trouble.”

 

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Wednesday, November 18, 2020 - 11:43am

microphysiologies of desire - This phrase reminded me of a quasi-similar concept of 'libidinal materialism' but the former presents desire in a much more 'distilled' manner. The generativity of desire and made synonymous with a Deleuzian affirmation on the part of organic and nonorganic life, but there is no chaos to this understanding of desire - there is the generative nonlinearity of desire directed towards an ethics of matter. 

"As I outlined earlier, microphysiologies of desire are feminist practices of encounter. They help us articulate an applied ethics of matter and develop strategies for moving forward in our scientific work." - Are there ways that the microphysiologies of desire can produced the opposite of ethics of matter? Are there aspects of desire being written out in this elaboration/conceptualization of desire? This is not to say that desire must be lack, but does generative desire have to be ethical? 

"As some readers may anticipate, no chapter on developing feminist practices of encounter in the natural sciences would be complete without invoking the work of Donna Haraway. Her writing directs us toward those microphysiologies of desire that help us make connections through kinship and hylozoism. I am interested in bringing together and developing a vocabulary of ontological and ethical gestures that the feminist scientist might find useful in the lab. I am particularly interested in those micro-physiologies of desire that help position the feminist scientist as a knower who operates in the same immanent plane as that which is to become the known. For some time, Haraway has turned her attention to the practices and effects of multispecies entanglements. In Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene, Haraway describes the significance of her concept of “staying with the trouble.” She writes: “My multispecies story- telling is about recuperation in complex histories that are as full of dying as living, as full of endings, even genocides, as beginnings. In the face of unrelenting historically specific surplus suffering in companion species knottings, I am not interested in reconciliation or restoration, but I am deeply committed to the more modest possibilities of partial recuperation and getting on together. Call that staying with the trouble.”

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